Library

 

Opening Hours:

The Shibuya Library is open before and after school for loans at the following times:
Mondays*, Tuesdays and Wednesdays: 08:15 – 08:35
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays: 15:15 – 16:30
*Occasionally the library will be closed on Monday mornings due to Parents’ Information Meetings or PTA Meetings. Details will be in ‘The Lion’. Closure days: October: 29th and November 5th and 12th.

The Showa Libraries are open every day during lesson times. The Primary Library is also open during lunch times on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays and the Secondary Library every day during break and lunchtimes.

Returns:
We ask for all library returns to be placed in the blue boxes as children come into school. In Shibuya they are by entrances at the front and the back of the school. In Showa they are inside on the stairs going up in the mornings.
We would prefer for books to be returned this way rather than during lesson time as it frees us up to do more interesting activities rather than wasting time returning books during library sessions.
Books can be renewed during any library session even if you do not have the book on you. All we need is to bring up your profile on the screen.
If a library resource gets damaged while you are borrowing it, please do alert us so that we can repair it. Please do return all broken parts of magazines and books. Please do not throw them away.
We will unfortunately be charging for lost or completely damaged books using the Amazon Japan rates.

Parents’ Loans: Books and Magazines

The Shibuya Library has an ever growing number of parents’ fiction and non-fiction books. The non-fiction books can be found in the main library and the fiction books are shelved in the little office at the back. The can be borrowed during any before or after school library sessions or during the Friday Morning PTA Coffee Mornings.
The PTA also pays for subscriptions to the following magazine which you can borrow as well:
Australian Women’s Weekly (Australia)
BBC Good Food (UK)
Donna Hay (Australia)
Marie Claire (UK)
North and South (New Zealand)
OK! (UK)
Red (UK)
Some parents read them while waiting for their children on the blue leather sofa in the Shibuya Reception. You will find them on the left hand side on the grey trolley just as you enter the library. The newest editions are in the plastic folder with back issues in the boxes next to them.
Parents’ Loans are for one term at a time though they can be easily renewed until June 2013.

New Parents’ Fiction

We are constantly adding to the Parents’ Shelves. Some of the recently added books
include J.K. Rowling’s ‘The Casual Vacancy’. We do hope that you enjoy this book but we are not lending this title to any children as it is really not suitable or appropriate for
them. The book has absolutely nothing to do with Harry Potter or Hogwarts.

We have also added several new titles to our ever expanding and popular Scandicrime
section. ‘The Bat’ is the very first Harry Hole book when the Norwegian author Jo Nesbø first introduced us to the series way back in 1997 in Scandinavia. I am not quite sure why this book did not come out before in English. We now have eight books in the very popular series. (We also have some of his children’s books available in the Showa Primary Library. There is absolutely no murder or violence in them!)

We have included some really good mysteries by the Danish author Jussi Adler-Olsen. One of his books has been nominated for this year’s Sakura High School International Reading Award which we are doing in Showa Secondary. (Please see www.sakuramedal.com for more details). We have both of his books that are available in English: ‘Mercy’ and ‘Disgrace’.

From Iceland we have another book by the ever popular and multi award winning Arnaldur Indriðason.

Finally from Sweden we have two new authors that have been added to our collection Kristina Ohlsson, who has a very high rating on Waterstones’s website and Håkan Östlundh, who has recently been translated into English for the first time.

Thank you,
Mr Steven
The Library Department
The British School in Tokyo